Jade vine flowers


A Jade vine, donated to Bridgwater College’s Walled Gardens of Cannington, by Kew Gardens in 2008, has come into flower.


The Jade vine (Strongylodon macrobotrys), which originates from the rainforests of the Philippines, was given to The Walled Gardens of Cannington with the aim of being used for the common good in scientific research, education, conservation and development of botanic gardens. It is located within the Gardens’ Botanical Glasshouse in the Tropical Zone, which is kept at 22ºc during the day and 20ºc at night. Other gardens that have a Jade vine include Kew, the Eden Project and Cambridge University’s Botanic Garden. The Walled Gardens of Cannington is helping the conservation effort as the Jade vine is endangered in its native country due to habitat destruction.


Jayne Alcock, Grounds and Gardens Supervisor said, “The Jade vine always causes a stir when it comes into flower. Its stunning colouring gives it an almost unreal quality. I promise visitors that I haven’t sprayed it that colour! It is pollinated by bats, so a lovely time to view it is in the early evening light, when it appears to almost glow.”


The Gardens has also seen their Magnolia campbellii flowering, a pink tree, whose flowers are up to 30cm across. The Walled Gardens is currently taking part in the Royal Horticultural Society’s Magnolia campbellii 2015 survey, to chart the arrival of spring.


Jade vine


Jade vine in the Botanical Glasshouse


Magnolia


Magnolia campbellii in the Australasian Garden